International Journal of Sustainable Development Research

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Characterization of Household Solid Wastes in the Niger Delta: A Case Study of 100-Domestic Units in Yenagoa Metropolis, Nigeria

Received: 22 September 2017    Accepted: 10 October 2017    Published: 10 November 2017
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Abstract

Household solid waste (HSW) stream is becoming problematic due to the threat they posed to the environment and public health. Application of inefficient and insufficient management strategies results in unsegregated HSW which are burnt, or left to undergo biological or physicochemical transformation which affects the atmospheric ambient air quality of the environment. In this study, waste streams were characterized in a block multi-stage and stratified randomized post-monthly study, comprising of 100-domestic unit. Comparatively, the mass composition of garbage (food) waste streams was 211.50kg (40.82%) in dry season, and 285.70kg (42.81%) in wet season. Plastic/rubber wastes, had values of 127.00kg (24.51%) and 138.01kg (20.68%) in dry and wet seasons respectively. Similarly, paper waste stream was 70.30kg (13.56%) in dry season and 98.41kg (1476.68%) in wet season. Furthermore, glass/ceramic waste had seasonal values of 56.20kg (10.85%) for dry season and 62.59kg (9.37%) for wet season. Furthermore, the composition of metal and wood waste streams per 100 domestic units in dry/wet season were reported as; 29.50kg (5.70%)/39.40 (5.90%) for metals; and 12.70kg (2.45%)/24.23 (3.63%) for wood. Other unclassified and special wastes streams which includes but not limited to ashes, sand, stones, clothes were reported to have values of 10.90kg (2.10%) in dry season and 19.00kg (2.85%) in wet season. Disposal of uncharacterized HSW is hazardous and pose grave consequences to the environment, we therefore urge the populace to desist from reckless disposal of HSWs and also urge Government to formulate policies the will enhance safe disposal of wastes for the effective reuse and recycling.

DOI 10.11648/j.ijsdr.20170305.12
Published in International Journal of Sustainable Development Research (Volume 3, Issue 5, September 2017)
Page(s) 50-53
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Waste Stream, Anthropogenic Activity, Municipal Solid Waste, Yenagoa Metropolis

References
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[3] Angaye, T. C. N., Zige, D. V. and Izah, S. C. (2015). Microbial load and heavy metals properties of leachates from solid wastes dumpsites in the Niger Delta, Nigeria. Journal of Environmental Treatment Techniques, 3(3): 175-180.
[4] Angaye, T. C. N., Angaye W. T., Oyinke G. N., Konmeze O. (2016). Environmental Impact of Scrap Metal Dumpsites on Vegetation, Soil and Groundwater in Yenagoa Metropolis, Nigeria. Journal of Environmental Treatment Techniques. 4(3): 31-36.
[5] Doan, P. L. (1998). Institutionalizing household waste collection: the urban environmental management project in Cote d’Ivoire. Habitat International, 22(1):27-39.
[6] Hossain M. L., Roy Das, S., Talukder, S., Hossain, M. (2014). Generation of Municipal Solid Waste in Commercial City of Bangladesh. Journal of Environmental Treatment Techniques. 2(3): 109-114.
[7] Abur, B. T., Oguche, E. E., Duvuna, G. A. (2014). Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste in the Federal Capital Abuja, Nigeria. Global Journal of Science Frontier Research: Environment & Earth Science, 14(2): 1-6.
[8] Angaye, T. C. N., Abowei, J. F. N (2017). Review on the Environmental Impacts of Municipal Solid Waste in Nigeria: Challenges and Prospects. Greener Journal of Environmental Health and Public Safety, 2(6): 18-33.
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[14] Oyelami, A. C., Aladejana, J. A., Agbede O. O. (2013). Assessment of the impact of open waste dumpsites on groundwater quality: a case study of the Onibu-Eja dumpsite, southwestern Nigeria. Procedia Earth and Planetary Science 7: 648-651.
[15] National Population Census-NCP (2006). Bayelsa State Population Census, National Population Census, Federal Republic of Nigeria.
[16] Igbinomwanhia, D. I (2012). Characterization of Commercial Solid Waste in Benin Metropolis, Nigeria. Journal of Emerging Trends in Engineering and Applied Sciences, 3(5):834-838.
[17] Musa, A. A., Labo, A. S., Lamido, S. M., Salisu, S. A., Ibrahim, M. B., Bello, N. (2016). Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste, In Kazaure Local Government Area, Jigawa State, Nigeria. International journal of Engineering sciences & research Technology, 5(7): 292-296.
[18] Ugwuishiwu B. O., Nwodo J. C. and Echiegu E. A. (2016). Municipal Solid Waste Characterization in Nsukka Urban in South East Nigeria. Transylvanian Review, 14(7): 808-815.
[19] Okey, E. N., Umana, E. J., Markson, A. A., Okey, P. A. (2013). Municipal Solid Waste Characterization and Management in Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. Transactions on Ecology and the Environment, 173(6): 639-648.
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    Tariwari Chidi Angaye, Chidinma Daokoru-Olukole, Jasper Freeborn Nestor Abowei. (2017). Characterization of Household Solid Wastes in the Niger Delta: A Case Study of 100-Domestic Units in Yenagoa Metropolis, Nigeria. International Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 3(5), 50-53. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijsdr.20170305.12

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    ACS Style

    Tariwari Chidi Angaye; Chidinma Daokoru-Olukole; Jasper Freeborn Nestor Abowei. Characterization of Household Solid Wastes in the Niger Delta: A Case Study of 100-Domestic Units in Yenagoa Metropolis, Nigeria. Int. J. Sustain. Dev. Res. 2017, 3(5), 50-53. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsdr.20170305.12

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    AMA Style

    Tariwari Chidi Angaye, Chidinma Daokoru-Olukole, Jasper Freeborn Nestor Abowei. Characterization of Household Solid Wastes in the Niger Delta: A Case Study of 100-Domestic Units in Yenagoa Metropolis, Nigeria. Int J Sustain Dev Res. 2017;3(5):50-53. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsdr.20170305.12

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ijsdr.20170305.12,
      author = {Tariwari Chidi Angaye and Chidinma Daokoru-Olukole and Jasper Freeborn Nestor Abowei},
      title = {Characterization of Household Solid Wastes in the Niger Delta: A Case Study of 100-Domestic Units in Yenagoa Metropolis, Nigeria},
      journal = {International Journal of Sustainable Development Research},
      volume = {3},
      number = {5},
      pages = {50-53},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ijsdr.20170305.12},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijsdr.20170305.12},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ijsdr.20170305.12},
      abstract = {Household solid waste (HSW) stream is becoming problematic due to the threat they posed to the environment and public health. Application of inefficient and insufficient management strategies results in unsegregated HSW which are burnt, or left to undergo biological or physicochemical transformation which affects the atmospheric ambient air quality of the environment. In this study, waste streams were characterized in a block multi-stage and stratified randomized post-monthly study, comprising of 100-domestic unit. Comparatively, the mass composition of garbage (food) waste streams was 211.50kg (40.82%) in dry season, and 285.70kg (42.81%) in wet season. Plastic/rubber wastes, had values of 127.00kg (24.51%) and 138.01kg (20.68%) in dry and wet seasons respectively. Similarly, paper waste stream was 70.30kg (13.56%) in dry season and 98.41kg (1476.68%) in wet season. Furthermore, glass/ceramic waste had seasonal values of 56.20kg (10.85%) for dry season and 62.59kg (9.37%) for wet season. Furthermore, the composition of metal and wood waste streams per 100 domestic units in dry/wet season were reported as; 29.50kg (5.70%)/39.40 (5.90%) for metals; and 12.70kg (2.45%)/24.23 (3.63%) for wood. Other unclassified and special wastes streams which includes but not limited to ashes, sand, stones, clothes were reported to have values of 10.90kg (2.10%) in dry season and 19.00kg (2.85%) in wet season. Disposal of uncharacterized HSW is hazardous and pose grave consequences to the environment, we therefore urge the populace to desist from reckless disposal of HSWs and also urge Government to formulate policies the will enhance safe disposal of wastes for the effective reuse and recycling.},
     year = {2017}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Characterization of Household Solid Wastes in the Niger Delta: A Case Study of 100-Domestic Units in Yenagoa Metropolis, Nigeria
    AU  - Tariwari Chidi Angaye
    AU  - Chidinma Daokoru-Olukole
    AU  - Jasper Freeborn Nestor Abowei
    Y1  - 2017/11/10
    PY  - 2017
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijsdr.20170305.12
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ijsdr.20170305.12
    T2  - International Journal of Sustainable Development Research
    JF  - International Journal of Sustainable Development Research
    JO  - International Journal of Sustainable Development Research
    SP  - 50
    EP  - 53
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2575-1832
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijsdr.20170305.12
    AB  - Household solid waste (HSW) stream is becoming problematic due to the threat they posed to the environment and public health. Application of inefficient and insufficient management strategies results in unsegregated HSW which are burnt, or left to undergo biological or physicochemical transformation which affects the atmospheric ambient air quality of the environment. In this study, waste streams were characterized in a block multi-stage and stratified randomized post-monthly study, comprising of 100-domestic unit. Comparatively, the mass composition of garbage (food) waste streams was 211.50kg (40.82%) in dry season, and 285.70kg (42.81%) in wet season. Plastic/rubber wastes, had values of 127.00kg (24.51%) and 138.01kg (20.68%) in dry and wet seasons respectively. Similarly, paper waste stream was 70.30kg (13.56%) in dry season and 98.41kg (1476.68%) in wet season. Furthermore, glass/ceramic waste had seasonal values of 56.20kg (10.85%) for dry season and 62.59kg (9.37%) for wet season. Furthermore, the composition of metal and wood waste streams per 100 domestic units in dry/wet season were reported as; 29.50kg (5.70%)/39.40 (5.90%) for metals; and 12.70kg (2.45%)/24.23 (3.63%) for wood. Other unclassified and special wastes streams which includes but not limited to ashes, sand, stones, clothes were reported to have values of 10.90kg (2.10%) in dry season and 19.00kg (2.85%) in wet season. Disposal of uncharacterized HSW is hazardous and pose grave consequences to the environment, we therefore urge the populace to desist from reckless disposal of HSWs and also urge Government to formulate policies the will enhance safe disposal of wastes for the effective reuse and recycling.
    VL  - 3
    IS  - 5
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Department of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, Niger Delta University, Amassoma Wilberforce Island, Nigeria

  • Department of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, Niger Delta University, Amassoma Wilberforce Island, Nigeria

  • Department of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, Niger Delta University, Amassoma Wilberforce Island, Nigeria

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