International Journal of Sustainable Development Research

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Rural Electrification and Maize Value Addition in Mpumudde Sub-County, Lyantonde District

Received: 11 December 2023    Accepted: 4 January 2024    Published: 18 January 2024
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Abstract

The study was about rural electrification on maize value addition in Mpumunde Sub-County, Lyantonde District. The study specific objectives were to; characterize maize value addition actors benefiting from rural electrification, identify factors limiting farmers from participating in maize value addition other than electrification, assess the contribution of rural electrification towards adding value to maize. The study employed a descriptive cross-sectional research design and primary data was collected from 200 respondents. The data was analysed using SPSS version 22.0. The study concluded that maize value addition actors who benefited from rural electrification were characterized by low level of education that is average number of years in school being six; limited size of land with average of 4 acres and majority had productive age with an average of aged 38. The study also concluded that there were factors limiting farmers from participating in maize value addition other than electrification which were; limited training on value addition was significant at (p=.027). Skills and experience at (p=.021), Credit services/financing at (p=.003). Market availability at (p=.026). Materials and equipments to use at p= (.029). Level of education and storage facilities were seen non-significant at 5% level of significance with p-values (p=.312; p=.261). The final conclusion was that maize value adders agreed that the rural electrification connection to maize milling centers mostly were more efficient in their operations than the non-connected milling centers. They had improved quality value added products, efficiency in processing activities, operated for long hours and had faster processes. The study recommends that, there is a need for the government to link with the donors like World Bank who have already acknowledged through their own studies that there should be a need for massive injection of funds to support the rural electrification programme. There should be more grace period for the rural people in terms of repayment period since they are not used to the urban living style where deadlines on payment attract severe action like total disconnection. Maize value adders should be subsidized with value addition equipments at a fair price to help them sustain production of better quality value added products. The study recommends that village saving cooperative societies limited render soft and affordable loans at low interest rate to help farmers finance their value addition activities and ensure sustainability of quality value added products.

DOI 10.11648/j.ijsdr.20241001.11
Published in International Journal of Sustainable Development Research (Volume 10, Issue 1, April 2024)
Page(s) 1-8
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Rural Electrification, Maize Value Addition, Mpumudde, Lyantonde District

References
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[2] Adeleke, N, Ngendello, T., Rwiza, E., and Van Oirschot, Q., (2020). Maximizing incomes from sweet potato production as a contribution to rural livelihoods. Natural Resource Institute. Crop Post Harvest Programme.
[3] Ayanlade, L & Radeny, D, (2020). Electricity Model for China -Insights and Implications of Energy Policies. KTH Royal Institute of Technology Department of Energy Technology.
[4] Babu H. A, (2015). “Rural Electrification in India: Economic and Institutional Aspects of Renewables.” EPRG Working Paper 07/30, Electricity Policy Research Group, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
[5] Barnes, D. F. (2012). The Challenge of Rural Electrification: Strategies for Developing Countries. New York: Routledge.
[6] Dinkelman, T. (2021). The effects of rural electrification on employment: New evidence from South Africa. American Economic Review, 101(7), 3078-3108.
[7] Freedom, D, (2019). Factors Influencing Maize Value Addition by Rural Agribusiness Entrepreneurs in Abia State, Nigeria.” Scientific Papers Series Management, Economic Engineering in Agriculture and Rural Development 15, no. 3(2015): 19–24.
[8] GoU, (2015). Second National Development Plan (NDPII) 2015/16-2019/20.
[9] Katungi T. E., Nambi-Kasozi, J., Lumu, R & Bareeba, F., (2017). Strategies for coping with feed scarcity among urban and peri-urban livestock farmers in Kampala, Uganda. Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development in the Tropics and Subtropics, 113(2), 165-174.
[10] Knox, L, Jeuland, M and Shimeles, A. (2017). Addressing the Challenges of Sustainable Electrification in Africa through Comprehensive Impact Evaluations. Nairobi: African Economic Research Consortium.
[11] Kyriakarakos, A, Louw, A, Geyser, M and Troskie, G, (2020). The South African Agro-processing Sector and value addition improvement. Overview. Agro- processing Customised Sector Programme. Kwazulu Natal Trade and Investment Faire and Conference, Durban Exhibition Centre.
[12] Mill JS, (2016). Utilitarianism. Roger Crisp (ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
[13] Ministry of Finance, Planning and Economic Development, Approved Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure FYs 2013/14 – FY 2016/17.
[14] Okurut, H. E, Kalinda, T., Tembo, G, (2022). Econometric analysis of the factors that affect adoption of conservation farming practices by smallholder farmers in Hoima District, Uganda. J. Sust. Dev., 7(4): 124–139.
[15] Peters, J., & Sievert, M. (2020). On-grid and Off-grid Rural Electrification–Impacts and Cost Considerations Revisited. Revue deconomie du developpement, 23(3), 85-104.
[16] Peterson, D. E, R., Nkhonjera, M., & Tempia, N. (2009). Theoretical frame work on Structural transformation in agriculture and agro-processing value chains., Regulation and Economic Development, Working paper 8. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
[17] REA, Rural Electrification Strategy and Plan 2, 2013-2022.
[18] Rural Electrification Authority. (2018). Rural Electrification Authority Set to Electrify all Secondary Schools in the Country by 31 January 2018. Retrieved February 26, 2018.
[19] Sumberg, E. T, Hartvigsson, E., Pachauri, S., Colombo, E. (2019). Electricity access and rural development: Review of complex socio economic dynamics and casual diagrams for more appropriate energy modelling. Energy Sustainability and Development: Vol 43, page 203–223.
[20] Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL) initiative report (2017). Energy Access and Use Situation Survey II in Tanzania Mainland 2016/2017. Rural Energy Agency.
[21] Torero, M, (2021). The Impact of Rural Electrification: Challenges and Ways Forward. Revue D’économie du Développement, 3(3), 55-83. https://d oi.org/ 10.3917/edd.293.0055.
[22] Tura M., Aredo D., Tsegaye W., Girma T., Mwangi W. and Mwabu G. (2020). Adoption and continued use of improved maize seeds: Case study of central Ethiopia.‟ African Journal of Agricultural Research. 5: 2350-2358.
[23] Tushemereirwe, J, Foley, H. E, Gerald, K, (2018). Measuring Reasonably Reliable Access to Electricity Services in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Electricity Journal: Vol 33 Page 1-7.
[24] Uddin. M, Yesmin. S, Khan. M, Tania. M, Moonmoon. M, and Ahmed. S, (2020). Production of Corns in Different Seasonal Conditions of Bangladesh. Journal of scientific research, 3(1) 161-167.
[25] Vela-Cobos, D, Barnes, S and Samad, U. E, (2021). Energy Services for Sustainable Development in Rural Areas in Asia and the Pacific: Policy and Practice. New York: United Nations Publications.
[26] World Bank, (2020). Tracking SDG 7: The Energy Progress Report. World Bank, Washington DC.
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    Ssegilinya, S., Kalibwani, R., Nuwemuhwezi, G. (2024). Rural Electrification and Maize Value Addition in Mpumudde Sub-County, Lyantonde District. International Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 10(1), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijsdr.20241001.11

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    ACS Style

    Ssegilinya, S.; Kalibwani, R.; Nuwemuhwezi, G. Rural Electrification and Maize Value Addition in Mpumudde Sub-County, Lyantonde District. Int. J. Sustain. Dev. Res. 2024, 10(1), 1-8. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsdr.20241001.11

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    AMA Style

    Ssegilinya S, Kalibwani R, Nuwemuhwezi G. Rural Electrification and Maize Value Addition in Mpumudde Sub-County, Lyantonde District. Int J Sustain Dev Res. 2024;10(1):1-8. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsdr.20241001.11

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ijsdr.20241001.11,
      author = {Sulaiman Ssegilinya and Rebecca Kalibwani and Gershom Nuwemuhwezi},
      title = {Rural Electrification and Maize Value Addition in Mpumudde Sub-County, Lyantonde District},
      journal = {International Journal of Sustainable Development Research},
      volume = {10},
      number = {1},
      pages = {1-8},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ijsdr.20241001.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijsdr.20241001.11},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ijsdr.20241001.11},
      abstract = {The study was about rural electrification on maize value addition in Mpumunde Sub-County, Lyantonde District. The study specific objectives were to; characterize maize value addition actors benefiting from rural electrification, identify factors limiting farmers from participating in maize value addition other than electrification, assess the contribution of rural electrification towards adding value to maize. The study employed a descriptive cross-sectional research design and primary data was collected from 200 respondents. The data was analysed using SPSS version 22.0. The study concluded that maize value addition actors who benefited from rural electrification were characterized by low level of education that is average number of years in school being six; limited size of land with average of 4 acres and majority had productive age with an average of aged 38. The study also concluded that there were factors limiting farmers from participating in maize value addition other than electrification which were; limited training on value addition was significant at (p=.027). Skills and experience at (p=.021), Credit services/financing at (p=.003). Market availability at (p=.026). Materials and equipments to use at p= (.029). Level of education and storage facilities were seen non-significant at 5% level of significance with p-values (p=.312; p=.261). The final conclusion was that maize value adders agreed that the rural electrification connection to maize milling centers mostly were more efficient in their operations than the non-connected milling centers. They had improved quality value added products, efficiency in processing activities, operated for long hours and had faster processes. The study recommends that, there is a need for the government to link with the donors like World Bank who have already acknowledged through their own studies that there should be a need for massive injection of funds to support the rural electrification programme. There should be more grace period for the rural people in terms of repayment period since they are not used to the urban living style where deadlines on payment attract severe action like total disconnection. Maize value adders should be subsidized with value addition equipments at a fair price to help them sustain production of better quality value added products. The study recommends that village saving cooperative societies limited render soft and affordable loans at low interest rate to help farmers finance their value addition activities and ensure sustainability of quality value added products.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Rural Electrification and Maize Value Addition in Mpumudde Sub-County, Lyantonde District
    AU  - Sulaiman Ssegilinya
    AU  - Rebecca Kalibwani
    AU  - Gershom Nuwemuhwezi
    Y1  - 2024/01/18
    PY  - 2024
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijsdr.20241001.11
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ijsdr.20241001.11
    T2  - International Journal of Sustainable Development Research
    JF  - International Journal of Sustainable Development Research
    JO  - International Journal of Sustainable Development Research
    SP  - 1
    EP  - 8
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2575-1832
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijsdr.20241001.11
    AB  - The study was about rural electrification on maize value addition in Mpumunde Sub-County, Lyantonde District. The study specific objectives were to; characterize maize value addition actors benefiting from rural electrification, identify factors limiting farmers from participating in maize value addition other than electrification, assess the contribution of rural electrification towards adding value to maize. The study employed a descriptive cross-sectional research design and primary data was collected from 200 respondents. The data was analysed using SPSS version 22.0. The study concluded that maize value addition actors who benefited from rural electrification were characterized by low level of education that is average number of years in school being six; limited size of land with average of 4 acres and majority had productive age with an average of aged 38. The study also concluded that there were factors limiting farmers from participating in maize value addition other than electrification which were; limited training on value addition was significant at (p=.027). Skills and experience at (p=.021), Credit services/financing at (p=.003). Market availability at (p=.026). Materials and equipments to use at p= (.029). Level of education and storage facilities were seen non-significant at 5% level of significance with p-values (p=.312; p=.261). The final conclusion was that maize value adders agreed that the rural electrification connection to maize milling centers mostly were more efficient in their operations than the non-connected milling centers. They had improved quality value added products, efficiency in processing activities, operated for long hours and had faster processes. The study recommends that, there is a need for the government to link with the donors like World Bank who have already acknowledged through their own studies that there should be a need for massive injection of funds to support the rural electrification programme. There should be more grace period for the rural people in terms of repayment period since they are not used to the urban living style where deadlines on payment attract severe action like total disconnection. Maize value adders should be subsidized with value addition equipments at a fair price to help them sustain production of better quality value added products. The study recommends that village saving cooperative societies limited render soft and affordable loans at low interest rate to help farmers finance their value addition activities and ensure sustainability of quality value added products.
    
    VL  - 10
    IS  - 1
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Agriculture and Agribusiness, Bishop Stuart University, Mbarara, Uganda

  • Agriculture and Agribusiness, Bishop Stuart University, Mbarara, Uganda

  • Agriculture and Agribusiness, Bishop Stuart University, Mbarara, Uganda

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