Volume 5, Issue 1, March 2019, Page: 18-23
Building the Appropriate Capacity for Enabling Space Programs in Africa: The Nigerian Experience
Onuh Spencer, Satellite Systems Department, Centre for Satellite Technology Development, Abuja, Nigeria; Space Systems Department, National Space Research and Development Agency, Abuja, Nigeria
Chizea Francis, Space Systems Department, National Space Research and Development Agency, Abuja, Nigeria
Agboola Olufemi, Space Systems Department, National Space Research and Development Agency, Abuja, Nigeria
Akoma Henry, Satellite Systems Department, Centre for Satellite Technology Development, Abuja, Nigeria; Space Systems Department, National Space Research and Development Agency, Abuja, Nigeria
Received: Jan. 14, 2019;       Accepted: Feb. 22, 2019;       Published: Mar. 26, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijsdr.20190501.13      View  32      Downloads  7
Abstract
This paper x-rays the two-decade gradual yet steady strides made by Nigeria in building the capacity of its workforce in space science and technology. Information concerning the technical training modules on earth observation satellites (EOS), communication satellites, space transport and propulsion systems, and space systems application software is provided. Details are also provided of the locations for these training, the number of personnel involved and the associated cost implication for some of the capacity building programs. This review concludes that despite the funding challenges, global legal bottlenecks and the security implications associated with undertaking and executing a national space program, a continual investment in space capacity building programs is necessary, crucial and essential. This is because the immediate and long-term national benefits of these capacity building programs are immense and the spin-offs have trans-generational impacts.
Keywords
Capacity Building, Space Program, Africa, Nigeria, Know-How Technology Training, Hands-on Training
To cite this article
Onuh Spencer, Chizea Francis, Agboola Olufemi, Akoma Henry, Building the Appropriate Capacity for Enabling Space Programs in Africa: The Nigerian Experience, International Journal of Sustainable Development Research. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2019, pp. 18-23. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsdr.20190501.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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